Table of Contents 21.2 (2001)   22.2 (2002) ISSN 1943-3840

Cervantes


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 1 SPRING, 2002


Cover Graphic

E. C. Riley, 1923–2001


Bulletin of the Cervantes Society of America


Cervantes

Bulletin of the CERVANTES SOCIETY OF AMERICA


THE CERVANTES SOCIETY OF AMERICA

President
EDWARD H. FRIEDMAN

Vice President
JAMES A. PARR

Secretary-Treasurer
THERESA SEARS

Executive Council

ELLEN ANDERSON      MW VALERIE HEGSTROM
MARINA BROWNLEE NE DAVID BORUCHOFF
ANTHONY CÁRDENAS PC HARRY VÉLEZ QUIÑONES
MICHAEL MCGAHA SE SHERRY VELASCO
ADRIENNE MARTIN SW AMY WILLIAMSEN

CERVANTES: BULLETIN OF THE CERVANTES SOCIETY OF AMERICA

Editor: DANIEL EISENBERG

Managing Editor: FRED JEHLE

Book Review Editor: WILLIAM H. CLAMURRO

Editorial Board

JOHN J. ALLEN      MYRIAM YVONNE JEHENSON
ANTONIO BERNAT CARROLL B. JOHNSON
PATRIZIA CAMPANA FRANCISCO MÁRQUEZ VILLANUEVA
PETER DUNN FRANCISCO RICO
JAIME FERNÁNDEZ GEORGE SHIPLEY
EDWARD H. FRIEDMAN ALISON P. WEBER
AURELIO GONZÁLEZ DIANA DE ARMAS WILSON

Cervantes, official organ of the Cervantes Society of America, publishes scholarly articles in English and Spanish on Cervantes' life and works, reviews and notes of interest to cervantistas. Twice yearly. Subscription to Cervantes is a part of membership in the Cervantes Society of America, which also publishes a Newsletter. $20.00 a year for individuals, $40.00 for institutions, $30.00 for couples, and $10.00 for students. Membership is open to all persons interested in Cervantes. For membership and subscription, send check in US dollars to THERESA SEARS, Department of Romance Languages, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC 27402-6170 (tasears@uncg.edu). Manuscripts should be sent in duplicate, together with a self-addressed envelope and return postage, to DANIEL EISENBERG, Editor, Cervantes, Excelsior College, 7 Columbia Circle, Albany, NY 12203-5157 (daniel.eisenberg@bigfoot.com). The SOCIETY requires anonymous submissions, therefore the author's name should not appear on the manuscript; instead, a cover sheet with the author's name, address, and the title of the article should accompany the article. References to the author's own work should be couched in the third person. Books for review should be sent to WILLIAM H. CLAMURRO, Division of Foreign Languages, Emporia State University, Emporia, Kansas 66801-5087 (clamurrw@emporia.edu).

Copyright © 2002 by the Cervantes Society of America.



Cervantes
VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 1
TABLE OF CONTENTS


     E. C. Riley, 1923-2001
     JUDY RILEY, ANTHONY CLOSE, JUAN BAUTISTA AVALLE-ARCE, HELENA PERCAS DE PONSETI, KARL-LUDWIG SELIG PDF 5-15
Publications of E. C. Riley PDF
     JEREMY ROBBINS and DANIEL EISENBERG 17-26


ARTICLES
      La singularidad de la fama de Don Quijote PDF
      EDWARD C. RILEY 27-41
      Don Quixote's fame is a fundamental theme of the novel. Rather than the fame he desires as a traditional type of hero, he achieves, ironically, fame as a character in an incredibly successful novel. He becomes the prototype of a new, modern, democratic hero, thanks to Cervantes' implanting in him —and in Sancho— a recognizable vitality that keeps on living in new and different artistic forms.

      A Portrait of Don Quijote from the Palette of Chaos Theory PDF
      ROBERT FLORES 43-70
      Un libro, el objeto físico —un ejemplar de la edición príncipe de la primera parte de Don Quijote, por ejemplo— puede ser tocado, visto, dibujado, fotografiado, tallado, pero ¿cómo representar el complejísimo proceso de creación artística del que surgió, y el resultado inefable de ese proceso? Me aprovecho de la nueva ciencia del caos para sugerir una respuesta a estas preguntas, dándole textura e identidad física a Don Quijote, para así poder ver el espíritu perenne de la obra de Cervantes.

      La disputa del baciyelmo y “El retablo de las maravillas”: Sobre el carácter dramático de los capítulos 44 y 45 de la primera parte de Don Quijote PDF
      VERÓNICA AZCUE CASTILLÓN 71-81
      Features of the dispute over the identity of the barber's basin characterize it as a both static and action-oriented type of entremés. Specific affinities link it with “El retablo de las maravillas.” Structural similarities arise from a common pattern of dramatic development. Three motifs are central to both works: the relationship between drama and life, the perspectivism of human experience, and the importance of class distinctions.

      Las bodas de Camacho y la sociedad del espectáculo PDF
      FRANCISCO VIVAR 83-109
      Camacho's identity is based on display of wealth, by means of which he attempts to persuade and control the onlookers. However, as seen in the differing reactions of Don Quijote and Sancho, his technique is not successful with everyone.

      Los relatos orales del Persiles PDF
      ISABEL LOZANO-RENIEBLAS 111-126
      In the Greek novel, oral first-person narratives delay the main plot. Cervantes uses them for different aesthetic purposes. They allow the introduction of an appraisal of the work, break up the main plot, and introduce themes alien to the literary tradition. Finally, first-person narratives also add color to the novel, explore different points of view, and indivdualize the characters. In sum, they expand the borders of fiction.


REVIEW ARTICLE
      Un misterio dilucidado: Pasamonte fue Avellaneda PDF
      HELENA PERCAS DE PONSETI 127-154


REVIEWS PDF
      Edward C. Riley. La rara invención. Estudios sobre Cervantes y su posteridad literaria. PDF
      PATRICIA CAMPANA 155-157

      Jean Canavaggio. Cervantes entre vida y creación. PDF
      JESÚS G. MAESTRO 158-165

      Arsenio Lope Huerta. Los Cervantes de Alcalá. PDF
      DANIEL EISENBERG 165-166

      Hans-Jörg Neuschäfer. La ética del Quijote: Función de las novelas intercaladas. PDF  
      ERIC J. KARTCHNER 166-169

      Maria Caterina Ruta. Il Chisciotte e i suoi dettagli. PDF
      DOMINICK FINELLO 169-172

      Diana de Armas Wilson. Cervantes, the Novel, and the New World. PDF
      GEORGE MARISCAL 172-175

      Georgina Dopico Black. Perfect Wives, Other Women. Adultery & Inquisition in Early Modern Spain. PDF
      SUSAN PAUN DE GARCÍA 176-179

      Charles D. Presberg. Adventures in Paradox: Don Quixote and the Western Tradition. PDF
      MICHAEL SCHAM 180-183

      David R.Castillo. (A)wry Views: Anamorphosis, Cervantes, and the Early Picaresque. PDF
      WILLIAM H. CLAMURRO 184-188


Forum
      Reply by James Iffland PDF 189-192


[BACK COVER]

Back cover graphic

Ted Riley at Consuegra


21.2 (2001) 22.2 (2002)
Fred Jehle jehle@ipfw.edu Publications of the CSA HCervantes
URL: http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/cervante/csa/bcsas02.htm