Table of Contents 12.1 (1992)   13.1 (1993) ISSN 1943-3840

Cervantes


VOLUME XII, NUMBER 2 FALL, 1992


Cover Graphic

Bulletin of the Cervantes Society of America


Cervantes

Bulletin of the CERVANTES SOCIETY OF AMERICA


THE CERVANTES SOCIETY OF AMERICA

President
RUTH EL SAFFAR (1994)

Vice President
JOHN J. ALLEN (1994)

Secretary-Treasurer
WILLIAM H. CLAMURRO (1994)

Executive Council

MARY M. GAYLORD PC ANTHONY CASCARDI
PETER DUNN SW DIANA WILSON
CARROLL B. JOHNSON MW MARY COZAD
HELENA PERCAS DE PONSETI SE DANIEL EISENBERG
ELIAS L. RIVERS NE THOMAS LATHROP/
  DOMINIC FINELLO

Cervantes: Bulletin of the Cervantes Society of  America

Editor: MICHAEL MCGAHA

Book Review Editor: EDWARD H. FRIEDMAN

Editor's Advisory Council

JUAN BAUTISTA AVALLE-ARCE     EDWARD C. RILEY
JEAN CANAVAGGIO ALBERTO SÁNCHEZ

Associate Editors

JOHN J. ALLEN     LUIS MURILLO
PETER DUNN LOWRY NELSON, JR.
RUTH EL SAFFAR HELENA PERCAS DE PONSETI
ROBERT M. FLORES GEOFFREY L. STAGG
EDWARD H. FRIEDMAN BRUCE W. WARDROPPER
CARROL B. JOHNSON ALISON P. WEBER
FRANCISCO MÁRQUEZ VILLANUEVA

Cervantes, official organ of the Cervantes Society of America, publishes scholarly articles in English and Spanish on Cervantes' life and works, reviews, and notes of interest to cervantistas. Twice yearly. Subscription to Cervantes is a part of membership in the Cervantes Society of America, which also publishes a Newsletter. $17.00 a year for individuals, $20.00 for institutions, $28.00 for couples, and $9.00 for students. Membership is open to all persons interested in Cervantes. For membership and subscription, send check in dollars to Professor WILLIAM H. CLAMURRO, Secretary-Treasurer, The Cervantes Society of America, Dept. of Modern Languages, Denison University, Granville, Ohio 43023. Manuscripts should be sent in duplicate, together with a self-addressed envelope and return postage, to Professor MICHAEL MCGAHA, Editor, Cervantes, Department of Modern Languages, Pomona College, Claremont, California 91711-6333. The SOCIETY requires anonymous submissions, therefore the author's name should not appear on the manuscript; instead, a cover sheet with the author's name, address, and the title of the article should accompany the article. References to the author's own work should be couched in the third person. Books for review should be sent to Professor EDWARD FRIEDMAN, Book Review Editor, Cervantes, Dept. of Spanish and Portuguese, Ballantine Hall, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405.

Copyright © 1992 by the Cervantes Society of America.



Cervantes
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 2
International Colloquium on
Eroticism and Witchcraft in Cervantes
Selected Papers
Edited by José Antonio Cerezo Aranda and Daniel Eisenberg


TABLE OF CONTENTS


Introducción 5

 ARTICLES
      Erotismo y marginación social en la novela cervantina
      MONIQUE JOLY

7

      In this paper a parallel is established between the sum total of obscene allusions which Sancho makes whenever he comes across a sexually desirable young woman, and those that are made in the “danza guiada” in La ilustre fregona. In both cases the divergent handling of improper and abnormal attitudes with respect to love reveals the ideological filter through which Cervantes views the country bumpkin to whom he can ascribe positive values, as opposed to the urban infra-world, which he represents in a much harsher manner.

      “El sagaz perturbador del género humano”: Brujas, perros embrujados y otras demonomanías cervantinas
      MAURICIO MOLHO

21

      This paper analyzes various demonomaniacal manifestations in Cervantes' work: What is the role of the devil? Does Cervantes' devil belong to the philosophico-religious apparatus of Christianity? What is the nature of his sagacity? How does he operate when he doesn't delegate his powers to witches or warlocks?

      Contexto histórico y tratamiento literario de la “hechicería” morisca y judía en el Persiles
      JOSÉ IGNACIO DÍEZ FERNÁNDEZ AND LUISA FERNANDA AGUIRRE DE CÁRCER

33

      The medical activities of the Moriscos during the Golden Age occupied a shadowy middle ground between their own cultural heritage and the demands of the Christian society in which they lived. That society defended itself against their competition (in a process of increasing corporativism) by legal measures which sought to ban them from officially practicing medicine. For that purpose such distortions as accusations of magic, and hence, of heresy, were used against them. In his Persiles Cervantes distinguishes between sorcery and magic, and develops his ideas, above all, in two case histories: one featuring Moriscos (Cenotia), the other, Jews (the wife of Zabulón). The methods in the two cases differ, although both involve love stories. Cervantes' treatment of the subject is anecdotal, hackneyed, and almost incoherent.

      Berganza y la moza ventanera
      JOSÉ LUIS ÁLVAREZ MARTÍNEZ

63

      This paper is an interpretation of the text in the Coloquio de los perros where Berganza heeds the flattery of an “extremely beautiful girl” whom the dog approaches “as if to see what she wanted” (to seize the meat he was carrying). The text is permeated with eroticism. Berganza approaches “as if to see,” but his private reasons are less admissible. Hence the pun: “flesh [in the basket] has gone to flesh” [of erotic desire]. We explain the trick of the clog and interpret the cryptic message: “just a hair of the wolf, and that from its forehead.”

      Una lectura erótica del Quijote
      ALFREDO BARAS ESCOLÁ

79

      Aside from the very few episodes in which eroticism is literally expressed, there are many other passages in the novel which allow of a double meaning —one innocent, the other ribald. We shall point out some of these words and phrases which were formerly used with an erotic meaning. It would certainly be absurd to read such meanings into Don Quixote if these expressions did not occur in clearly allusive contexts. However, the fact that they are imbedded in such important aspects as Don Quixote's name, his profession as knight errant, and the description of Sancho Panza proves that Cervantes relied on this sort of humor not only in his Ocho entremeses —as has already been demonstrated— but in his masterpiece as well.

      Auristela hechizada: Un caso de maleficia en el Persiles
      ANTONIO CRUZ CASADO

91

      Cervantes' fondness for the subject of sorcery is manifest not only in the well known Coloquio de los perros but also in many other areas of his work, among which Persiles y Sigismunda particularly stands out. In the concluding chapters of that novel the heroine is bewitched by means of a malignant spell cast by a Jewess who resides in Rome. The episode is a sort of tour de force which culminates a series of difficulties the lovers Periandro and Auristela have had to undergo. We shall point out an interesting parallel with a similar situation in La española inglesa, as well as some classical antecedents from the Greek narrative of adventures.

      El vocabulario erótico cervantino: Algunas “calas al aire” en el entremés de El viejo celoso
      JOSÉ RAMÓN FERNÁNDEZ DE CANO Y MARTÍN

105

      Critics of Cervantes' work have been unanimous in poing out the rather shocking eroticism of El viejo celoso. Nevertheless, though much has been written about Cervantes' uninhibited portrayal of highly obscene material in this work, scholars have not yet analyzed his masterful use of a colloquial vocabulary rich in double meanings. I shall demonstrate that for the seventeenth century audience, the play's language was at least as scandalous as the behavior presented on stage.

      Posesión demoníaca, locura y exorcismo en el Quijote
      MICHAEL D. HASBROUCK

117

      Critics have proposed various explanations of Don Quixote's madness, such as an excess of melancholy or of choler. I argue in this paper that demoniacal possession is another possibility. In Don Quixote the protagonist's behavior often suggests possession by the devil; in fact other characters often confuse Don Quixote with the devil. I interpret an episode in II, 62 in which Don Quixote exclaims: “Fugite, partes adversae!” as a sort of exorcism; and I also examine the similarities between Don Quixote's trampling by swine (II, 68) and the most famous exorcism in the Bible.

      Las brujas de Cervantes y la noción de comunidad femenina
      STEVEN HUTCHINSON

127

      The Novelas ejemplares present several autonomous communities or microcosms, one of which is the double —mainly female— world of witches in the Coloquio. While sorcery is a solitary art, witchcraft is a community practice, a cult. The community of witches has a double existence: it is a secret and geographically dispersed society which really only functions as a community when it comes together for the witches' Sabbath. This countercommunity is distinguished by its feminine practices, beliefs, and relationships. In view of the limited relations between women in Cervantes' novels, this focus on a female community is of extraordinary interest, showing an alternative society and eroticism, and the mystery of birth.

      La mujer vestida de hombre en el teatro de Cervantes
      KENJI INAMOTO

137

      Women dressed as men first appeared in the Madrid corrales in 1587. Because of its obvious erotic appeal, the practice was banned in the theater regulations promulgated in 1608 and 1615, but playwrights and actors found ways to get around the prohibitions. Cervantes made very little use of the technique, and this can be interpreted as a criticism of Lope de Vega and other contemporary playwrights.

      Estado actual de los otros conocimientos —también llamados brujería— en Montilla
      “ROSAMUNDA

145

      An insider surveys the practice of witchcraft and other occult activities in Montilla today.


REVIEWS
      Eduardo Urbina. El sin par Sancho Panza: parodia y creación.
      (ANTHONY J. CÁRDENAS) 149

      Daniel Eisenberg. Estudios cervantinos.
      (CHARLES ORIEL) 151

      Randall W. Listerman, translator. Miguel de Cervantes' Interludes/Entremeses
      (EVELIO ECHEVARRÍA) 154


Prepared with the help of Sue Dirrim
12.1 (1992) 13.1 (1993)
Fred Jehle jehle@ipfw.edu Publications of the CSA HCervantes
URL: http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/cervante/csa/bcsaf92.htm