Dena's Site

Yes, I realize that my research has nothing to do with cats! I just thought that they were so cute that I would share, besides, I like the way they communicate...

lystd@ipfw.edu

It's time to start thinking outside the box.....

This site is a compilation of several courses that I have taken as a communication graduate student. Please click on one of the links below to see information about various aspects of communication.

My boy Stoli!

 

NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION

 

SOCIAL PENETRATION THEORY

 

MY LATEST RESEARCH IN EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

 

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE RESEARCH FROM MY METHODS CLASS

 


  LIFE AT MY HOUSE - CATS EVERYWHERE!
 

 

A VERBAL DISCOURSE ON NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION!

MY RESEARCH ADDRESSES THE EFFECT OF DRESS ON EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES.

Article Critique Summary

Clothing Interest, Clothing Satisfaction, and Self-perceptions of Sociability, Emotional Stability, and Dominance, by Sarah Cosbey describes a study which attempts to define how one’s behavior might be influenced by dress in relation to one’s personal clothing interest. The paper supports the notion that our nonverbal cues related to dress can and do affect the way that one interacts with others, and in fact the way one perceives himself or herself in particular situations.

While the literature in this subject appears to be quite limited, the author well reviewed what was found and seems to have taken a fresh approach to the subject. The question is whether that approach is relevant and if the information gathered is valid. Using previously tested measures, the author incorporated a 5-point Likert-scaled survey in an effort to determine how clothing satisfaction impacted one’s abilities in given situations. A MANOVA analysis was then tabulated for each variable relating to clothing reference, satisfaction with clothing, and dissatisfaction with clothing. The results were clearly stated and unambiguous, but failed to meet any type of authoritative conclusion. The author does conclude that this study cannot be definitive because even those individuals who expressed a high level of clothing interest still “varied dramatically in the nature of that interest.” She further concludes that additional research is necessary to understand the different ways in which one might be motivated by dress and how this relates to other basic personality traits.

The limitations to the study were never fully discussed and they, in my mind, make the study virtually worthless. First, the subjects are all women, all students, and further most of the women were students in fashion or textiles and so would be more attuned to dress cues. With this population I feel that the results might be impossible to support in further studies utilizing a more well-rounded population.

Article Critique Full Text

 

 

 

 

 

 

Article Critique Full Text

Clothing Interest, Clothing Satisfaction, and Self-perceptions of Sociability, Emotional Stability, and Dominance, by Sarah Cosbey describes a study which attempts to define how one’s behavior might be influenced by dress in relation to one’s personal clothing interest. The paper supports the notion that our nonverbal cues related to dress can and do affect the way that one interacts with others, and in fact the way one perceives himself or herself in particular situations.
The literature review while limited did cite several studies directly related to the psychology of dress and the impact of dress on communication effectiveness. To the author’s credit, she did research the literature related to this subject all the way back to 1934, of course, since the literature is quite limited it was important that the author do so. The author is attempting to show some mitigating factor, the idea that individual’s have personal interest values when it comes to clothing, which might impact one’s perception as well as effectiveness based on their own dress concepts. From the literature cited, this is a fresh approach.
The author’s method was appropriate and incorporated several previously proven profiles and inventories which assessed sociability, emotional stability, and dominance. Using those measures, the author then incorporated a 5-point Likert-scaled survey in an effort to determine how clothing satisfaction impacted one’s abilities in given situations. A MANOVA analysis was then tabulated for each variable relating to clothing reference, satisfaction with clothing, and dissatisfaction with clothing. The results were clearly stated and unambiguous, however, I found the discussion, which was included with the results, to be difficult to read and disjointed.
As for the conclusions, I felt that the author missed an opportunity to expand on the impact that clothing might have on an individual’s communication patterns based on that individual’s clothing interest, although the author does mention the importance of understanding the individual’s tendency toward risk-taking or risk-avoiding dress. The author does conclude that this study cannot be definitive because even those individuals who expressed a high level of clothing interest still “varied dramatically in the nature of that interest.” She further concludes that additional research is necessary to understand the different ways in which one might be motivated by dress and how this relates to other basic personality traits.
Boiling it down, the research suggests that our emotional stability is specifically related to our clothing interest in relation to our satisfaction with our dress, which leads me to say, well, duh! And, in fact, most of the findings leave me with the same response. The only point that I found interesting and a bit surprising was the relationship with clothing satisfaction, clothing interest, and a sense of enhanced security. While I expected that the relationship would be high, it was dramatically higher than I expected and significantly higher than the relationship for those individuals who displayed a lack of clothing interest. Apparently many people do feel naked without the proper attire.
I was disappointed that the author failed to mention any limitations in the study, especially since I thought that one large flaw stood out, was significant, and should have been mentioned. That flaw is in the population of the study with consisted of 124 female only students who were enrolled in a Midwestern university. An amazing 89 percent of the subjects were majoring in a clothing and textiles-related course of study which would obviously skew their interests in clothing. With this population I feel that the results might be impossible to support in further studies utilizing a more well-rounded population.
Overall I found that the author utilized good research techniques with the development of the survey and the statistical analysis, found a fresh approach to the subject, and drew good conclusions from the data. Unfortunately, due to the sample population’s limitations I do not feel that the study can be accepted as significant.
The real interest that I have in this study relates to the effect of one’s self-perception related to dress and how that self-perception impacts one’s communication patterns. Because our self-perception directly relates to our communication effectiveness, the information garnered from this study might help me to better understand how others might read the nonverbal cues offered by a job candidate through their dress or their demeanor when applying for a position. Because first impressions are so important in the hiring process, and are not necessarily good indicators of a person’s true effectiveness on the job, the more we can do to understand and overcome incorrect first impressions, the better our hiring choices can become.

 

 

Social Penetration Theory

 

 

 

 

 

MY LATEST RESEARCH IN EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE!

This semester's research was an effort to determine if people working with the subject in different capacities (co-worker, co-student, agent of change) would rate the emotional intelligence of the subject differently. The hypothesis stated that they would but was not supported. Three main points garnered from this research were:

1. Emotional Intelligence is descernible, measurable and important when working with others in any capacity.


2. It is possible that people perceive Emotional Intelligence and will work with an individual even when they are unhappy about the work to be done.


3 . Studies such as this allow one to better understand how others perceive their leadership abilities and weaknesses.

 

 

 

 

The following links will take you to research I have been working on related to Emotional Intelligence. Understanding and working with Emotional Intelligence can change your life. If you want to be more successful in your work and personal life take a moment to peruse this material and then perhaps pick up Daniel Goleman's book and enjoy a good read.

Conclusion from literature  Qualitative Method   Observational Coding Method  

Survey Method Experimental Method

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

· Conclusion from literature

All of my research is based on the concept of emotional intelligence, first developed by Daniel Goleman in 1995. Goleman identifies the emotionally intelligent human as being self-aware, able to control one’s emotions, self-motivated, empathetic to other’s feelings, and able to handle relationships with others. Goleman’s work has been supported by numerous studies in the intervening years, and he continues to advance research into the effect of emotional intelligence on our everyday lives.

I am most interested in the effect of emotional intelligence when working with organizational communication and the literature supports the concept that emotional intelligence does reflect our ability not only to work well with our colleagues but also to succeed and progress in our work lives, to reduce the stress usually associated with work, and to improve job satisfaction.

 


· Qualitative Method and Results

ABSTRACT

This exploratory study seeks to delineate the effect of emotional intelligence, as described by Daniel Goleman (1995), in the success of communication in the workplace. Goleman identifies the emotionally intelligent human as being self-aware, able to control one’s emotions, self-motivated, empathetic to other’s feeling, and able to handle relationships with others. This study seeks to determine, through a series of discussion questions, if communication problems in the workplace can be traced to these factors. This preliminary study supports the fact that communication problems often stem from low emotional intelligence, specifically a lack of empathic understanding of others feelings or a lack of self control.


· Observational Coding Method and Results

This study seeks to determine if the qualities one looks for in a co-worker or supervisor fall into one of the categories of emotional intelligence, as described by Daniel Goleman (1995.) Goleman identifies the emotionally intelligent human as being self-aware, able to control one’s emotions, self-motivated, empathetic to other’s feeling, and able to handle relationships with others. By asking participants to list five personality characteristics that they would choose for co-workers and supervisors, and then coding those answers the study supports the idea that we look for traits of emotional intelligence in our co-workers and supervisors.


· Survey Method and Results

This study seeks to determine if people see themselves as having more emotional intelligence than their co-workers. Daniel Goleman in his 1995 research identified the emotionally intelligent human as being self-aware, able to control one’s emotions, self-motivated, empathetic to other’s feelings, and able to handle relationships with others. This study seeks to determine if one of the problems in interpersonal communication sometimes relates to our inability to accept our own emotional responsibility at the same time that we see ourselves as more responsive or empathetic than others see us.

. All respondents saw themselves as having a high degree of EI at the same time that they seem willing to question those traits in their co-workers.
Interestingly, each participant seemed to rate themselves at least one number higher than their co-workers on each item in the survey. So that if a participant rated himself or herself at a three, or average for a particular trait, he or she saw their co-workers as rating only a two in that category. This seems to suggest that the individuals truly saw themselves as generally better with what we might call people skills than they saw their co-workers. The question this might pose is whether our egos refuse to accept others as generally more likeable than ourselves, or if the lowest person in that group determines the group.


Further, not one participant found themselves below average in any of the characteristics. The participants rated themselves at the highest level on more than half of the possible responses, while at the same time allowing their co-workers the highest score on less than ten percent of the possible answers, with the remainder of the scores firmly at or below average.


· Experimental Method and Results

This experimental study seeks to determine if workers attitudes toward communication in the workplace will change after some training in the concept of emotional intelligence. Daniel Goleman (1995) identifies the emotionally intelligent human as being self-aware, able to control one’s emotions, self-motivated, empathetic to other’s feelings, and able to handle relationships with others. By defining these traits as responsibilities toward communication in a work situation, a questionnaire was developed and presented to a group of employees before and after seeing a video describing emotional intelligence. The results are significant and point to an ability to translate the concepts in the video to actual responsibilities in communication. This is a positive response to the idea that training for emotional intelligence is possible and should produce a positive change in communication patterns in the workplace.