Chaucer Bibliography

 

This is a basic introductory guide to get you started.  I highly recommend (= if you want a good grade you’ll do as I say) that you start with these resources, rather than starting with Google or a JSTOR-like database.  Electronic resources like those are very useful after you’ve gotten your feet wet.

 

Start here:

Everyone MUST use the following resource for their Tale Master Project

Chaucer’s Pilgrims- An Historical Guide to the Pilgrims in the Canterbury Tales,  ed. Laura C. Lambdin and Robert T. Lambdin

ON RESERVE at Helmke Library (ask at the service desk)

 

The Cambridge Companion to Chaucer, Piero Boitani and Jill Mann

ON RESERVE at Helmke Library (ask at the service desk)

 

The Chaucer Bibliography

The Chaucer Online Bibliography, 1975-present.

Updated annually. http://uchaucer.utsa.edu

 

Good Reference Works:

Use these and use their Bibliographies

Dictionary of the Middle Ages  / Joseph R. Strayer, editor in chief.

Location:           REFERENCE-- D114 .D5 1982

 

Medieval England: An Encyclopedia / editors: Paul E. Szarmach, M. Teresa Tavormina, Joel T. Rosenthal New York : Garland Pub., 1998.

            Location REFERENCE --DA129 .M43 1998

 

A Manual of the writings in Middle English, 1050-1500, by members of the Middle English Group of the Modern Language Association of America. (New Haven, Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences 1967-<1993 >)

Location REFERENCE-- PR 255 .M3

 

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages [electronic resource] / edited by André Vauchez translated by Adrian Walford, Oxford : Oxford University Press, c2001.

CALL NUMBER     Electronic Resource               ONLINE

            http://www.oxford-middleages.com/?authstatuscode=202

            NOTE: if you are off campus, this must be accessed through the Library Catalogue

 

The Catholic Encyclopedia: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/index.html

(this is an old resource, c. 1917, but has excellent in-depth introductions to many medieval subjects.  Its bibliography is probably too outdated to be helpful, and also beware of its obvious biases)

 

Speculum is the premiere journal of interdisciplinary medieval studies in the U.S.  Through the library, we have access to a searchable version of the first 75 years of publication (1926–2001); I highly recommend using it.

Speculum [electronic resource]
    Speculum (Cambridge, Mass. : Online)