NATIVE AMERICAN FOLKLORE

FOLK F352-01, FOLK F640-01, Spring, 2002

SYLLABUS

 

 

Time:               TR 1:30 – 2:45 p.m.

Place:               CM 148

Call Number:   3224, 3225

Instructor:       Chad Thompson

Office:             CM 223

Phone:             481-6775 (work), 485-1785 (home)

Web Page:       http://users.ipfw.edu/thompsoc/

E-mail:             ThompsoC@ipfw.edu

Office Hours:  TR 9:30 – 11:00a.m., MW 3:00 – 4:30p.m.

                        Or by appointment

 

 


Description and Outcomes:

Students will learn about verbal art from all of the culture areas of Native North America, from the Arctic to the Southwest.  The genres discussed will include traditional narratives (myths and legends), oratory, and song.  The oral literature will be discussed for both appreciation and critical analysis.  The cultural context of this body of literature will receive special emphasis.  At the end of the class you will be able to demonstrate knowledge in the following areas through exams and interpretive essays:

 

Requirements:

You will take three exams in addition to the final.  The exams will be a combination of essay and objective questions.   All students will write a term paper.  Each graduate student will present his or her term paper to the entire class.  Attendance is required, as most of the material covered on the exams will be from lectures.  I may lower the grade of any student with poor attendance.

 

 

 

Grading:

Exams (3 @ 20%)       60%

Final Exam                  20%

Term Paper                 20%

 

 

 

 


Text:

Swann, Brian.  1994.  Coming to Light:  Contemporary Translations of the Native Literatures of North America.  New York: Random House.

 

 

 

 


SCHEDULE

Week

Day

Topic

Assignments

1

1/15

General Introduction

Swann – Introduction

 

1/17

Problems of Authenticity and Translation

 

2

1/22 - 1/24

The Arctic

pp. 3-81

3

1/29 - 1/31

The Subarctic: Alaska/Yukon

pp. 82-150

4

2/5 - 2/7

The Subarctic:  Canada

pp. 176-221

5

2/12

Review; Koyukon

 

 

2/14

EXAM 1

 

6

2/19 - 2/21

Northwest Coast

pp. 223-310, 150-175

7

2/26

The Tlingit Potlatch

pp. 150-175

 

2/28

Plateau

pp. 311-356

8

3/5

Great Basin

pp.  357- 373

 

3/7

Catch Up and Review

 

9

3/12 - 3/14

SPRING BREAK

 

10

3/19

EXAM 2

 

 

3/21

The Plains

pp. 375-440

11

3/26 - 3/28

E. Woodlands

pp. 441-518

12

4/2

Southeast

pp. 704-714

 

4/4

Southwest

pp. 519-563, 690-703

Term Paper Topics

13

4/9 – 4/11

Southwest: Navajo and Apache

pp. 590-656

14

4/16

Southwest: Pueblo

pp. 564-589, 657-689

 

4/18

California

pp. 715-771

15

4/23

California

 

 

4/25

EXAM 3

 

16

4/30

Student Presentations

 

 

5/2

Review for Final Exam

Term Papers Due

           

 

 

 


Final Exam:  Thursday, May 9, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

You must take the final exam as scheduled.  There will be no make-up or early exams.  Please plan your vacation accordingly.

 

 


Term Paper:

Topic Due:      April 4

Paper Due:      May 2

Length:            double-spaced

            10-15 pages (FOLK F352)

            15-25 pages (FOLK F640)

The term papers can be about any aspect of Native American folklore, but should demonstrate extensive knowledge of a particular tradition.  You should write your topic down and turn it in to me by November 10.  I recommend that you discuss your topic with me before that date and discuss your progress with me during office hours some time after that date.  Final papers are due at the beginning of class, May 2.  Graduate students will make presentations of their papers in class.